Quick Tip Tuesday: LinkedIn Activity

Ever wonder how you can see someone’s past activities on LinkedIn? While your connections’ posts and activities show up on your LI home page, when you visit someone’s page on LI, you see only their profile, not their “wall” of past posts, like on Facebook.

This is somewhat hidden on LI, but it is possible to find. When you visit someone’s profile, click on the little arrow next to “Send a message” and the first option is “View recent activity.” This will bring you to a page with the person’s recent posts, likes, and profile changes (if they’ve set their settings to publish updates about profile changes).

You can see someone’s activities from the past two weeks even if they’re not a connection.

LinkedIn activity

 

Photo Fakery and the Challenge of Verification

Another week, another fake photo making the rounds in social media and raising outrage and/or hilarity. This time it is a photo of a gold toilet said to have belonged to Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych. Problem is, the photo has been around since at least 2012, and while the Ukrainian president may indeed be guilty of accumulating outrageous luxuries, there’s no evidence that the gold toilet belongs to him or anyone else in Ukraine.

Earlier this month, a number of Sochi Olympics photos went viral that were also fake or not attributable to Sochi. And you may remember this photo of the Egyptian pyramids blanketed with snow (for the first time in 112 years!) making the rounds in December.

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Pretty cool looking, but guess what? Fake.*

Hoaxes, rumours, misinformation, and fake stories and images have long found a welcoming home on the Internet, but with the rise of social media they get shared and disseminated even more quickly than before, sometimes by people who should know better. Sometimes verifying a piece of information is as simple as checking snopes.com or doing a Google search. Other times, however, it may take a bit more work to dig under the surface and confirm the veracity of a story or photo. This Storyful article is a good start for learning about some ways to verify images, such as checking the Exif data and cross-referencing with other sources like satellite images.

Storyful and a number of other news and non-governmental organizations such as the BBC and Amnesty International have released a free ebook called The Verification Handbook to help with identifying rumour and misinformation. While the book is geared toward verifying user-generated content in disaster and emergency situations, the tools and guidelines presented provide an excellent resource for all types of digital verification and investigations. And as the book’s editor Craig Silverman (of Regret the Errorstates, “We’re all media consumers and creators now. We can all be nodes in a network of truth or of falsehood. And we all, of course, want to have an accurate picture of what’s happening.” Learning how to judge the accuracy and credibility of information is one of the essential skills of the social media age.

For some great examples of how a skeptical and investigative mindset can be applied to photos and videos, watch this TED talk by Storyful’s former managing director:

*Fake and staged photos have a long history, going all the back to the early years of photography. For a fascinating story about how Errol Morris uncovered what may be the first faked photo, check out this Radiolab episode.
Photo source: Snopes.com

The Ethics of Social Media Cyber-Sleuthing

social media

Without a doubt, social media and social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and countless others have become indispensable tools in conducting background investigations, due diligence, employment pre-screening, and other types of investigations. Pursuit Magazine recently had a good two-part series that covered not just pointers to some lesser-known social media sites, but also discussed the importance of adequately capturing and presenting the information found on these sites.

The articles also highlighted some ethical and legal issues around gathering such information, advising, for example, against using shady techniques like pretexting and password cracking to gain access to protected material. Additionally, in Canada, a number of laws – notably human rights and privacy laws – govern the types of information that may be gathered on social media and elsewhere, the methods used for gathering the information, and the decisions made based on the information.

To stay on the side of the law, it is crucial for organizations and investigators to exercise caution when researching, collecting, and disclosing personal information about individuals. The Information and Privacy Commissioner of British Columbia has released some guidelines for social media background checks (PDF), identifying some pitfalls and issues to keep in mind:

  • Accuracy of information (Is it the right profile? Was the profile created by the individual himself or herself? Is the information current?)
  • Collecting irrelevant or too much information
  • Over-reliance on consent

Exercising good judgment when trawling social media sites isn’t just a matter of law and ethics; it can also save the organization from embarrassment, a lesson that the Toronto Star learned the hard way when it published false allegations against an Ontario MPP based on an old Facebook photo. The newspaper issued a rare front-page apology, citing an “egregious lapse” of standards.

Photo source: Jason Howie, Flickr