Quick Tip Tuesday: Twingly for Blog Searches

blogEver since Google dismantled its separate blog search engine, searching blogs has been cumbersome. Blog results are sprinkled throughout the main web results, and while Google still offers a separate blog screening mechanism via the News tab (click on “Search tools,” then “All news” and limit to blogs), the results seem limited to sources in its news database.

google blogs

IceRocket is still around, but I prefer not to rely on a single search engine.

Thankfully, Twingly provides a terrific alternative, with a robust advanced search screen offering excellent sorting and limiting tools. You can also set up email or RSS updates on your search terms. This is a great tool to add to your research toolbox.

Photo source: NOGRAN s.r.o., Flickr

Quick Tip Tuesday: Links from a Domain

I admit, I don’t use Bing as often as I should. This is mostly because I’m more comfortable with Google’s advanced search syntaxes, and when I want to search multiple search engines, I tend to use a meta search engine.

But Bing has some features that are unique and quite useful. One such feature is LinkFromDomain, a search operator that returns the pages that a website links to. Simply enter the web address after the operator (e.g., linkfromdomain:fsoresearch.ca).

This operator is obviously useful for SEO and link building, but for research purposes it provides a sense of what a site is about, and when used on an authoritative site, it leads the searcher to other authoritative sources of information. Check it out.

Quick Tip Tuesday: Searching for Corporate Directors

Today’s quick tip is from a presentation I’ll be giving on May 14 on business backgrounding and due diligence research. If you’re an info pro in the Toronto area, please join me for what I hope will be an information-rich session. You can sign up here.

In Canada, corporations can be formed in all provinces and territories as well as federally. However, searching by director name is only possible for a federally registered corporation. You can use the site: command in Google on the Corporations Canada site, or use the Canadian Federal Corporations and Directors database in FPInfomart, though this latter resource is populated by the vendor and is not comprehensive.

Quick Tip Tuesday: Financial Filings

All Canadian publicly traded companies must file documents through their provincial or territorial securities commission. These filings are publicly available through SEDAR.

A little-known tip is that Canadian companies that also trade in the U.S. sometimes have to file there earlier than they do in Canada. So if you’re looking for current filings and your company of interest also trades in the U.S., look for filings on EDGAR.

Quick Tip Tuesday: International Newspapers

I recently came across Newspaper Map, an interactive map of over 10,000 news outlets from around the world. Each pin links to the homepage of a news outlet, and provides links to Google translations in various languages (Chrome will also provide an option to translate the site). Digitized historical newspapers are also available by clicking “hist.,” though these are limited.

Quick Tip Tuesday: Company Extensions

If you do any kind of research on foreign companies, it’s imperative to know how the companies are structured. Canadian businesses fall into one of four categories — sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation, or cooperative — and corporations usually carry the designation Inc., Corp., or Ltd.

For foreign companies, there’s an array of other designations and extensions. This page provides a list of these extensions and explains what the terms mean and where they are used. The list also helps narrow your search if you don’t know what country a company is based in.

Quick Tip Tuesday: International Investigative Research

For international due diligence and investigative research, I’ve found Investigative Dashboard to be a wonderful resource:

Investigative Dashboard (ID) has been developed by the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP), the world’s leading cross border investigative reporting organization. OCCRP designed Investigative Dashboard as a transnational collaborative effort to help journalists and civil society researchers expose organized crime and corruption around the world. It hosts three core tools: a crowd-sourced database of information and documents on persons of interest and their business connections, a worldwide list of online databases and business registries, and a research desk where journalists can go for help in sourcing hard to find information.

The collection of business registries and related databases is terrifically useful.

Quick Tip Tuesday: LinkedIn Activity

Ever wonder how you can see someone’s past activities on LinkedIn? While your connections’ posts and activities show up on your LI home page, when you visit someone’s page on LI, you see only their profile, not their “wall” of past posts, like on Facebook.

This is somewhat hidden on LI, but it is possible to find. When you visit someone’s profile, click on the little arrow next to “Send a message” and the first option is “View recent activity.” This will bring you to a page with the person’s recent posts, likes, and profile changes (if they’ve set their settings to publish updates about profile changes).

You can see someone’s activities from the past two weeks even if they’re not a connection.

LinkedIn activity

 

Introducing Quick Tip Tuesdays

In an effort to blog more often and share more of what I know, I’m starting a new series of posts called Quick Tip Tuesday. Every Tuesday I’ll share a new research resource, a nifty search methodology, or an important lesson gleaned from my years of experience as a researcher. Perhaps I’ll even include items that have helped me in running my professional or personal life.

If you have any tips to share, I’d love to hear them. Please share them in the comments or email me.