Be Safe Online in 2014

ones and zerosOver at Slaw, Dan Pinnington has a series of posts (which originally appeared in LAWPRO Magazine) about protecting yourself online from the myriad scams and security risks that can afflict the unsuspecting or careless internet user. He tackles the dangers lurking in email, how to recognize and avoid surfing dangers, and how to avoid infections with anti-virus and anti-malware software. The posts are aimed at the legal profession, but anyone who needs a basic introduction to online security can benefit from them.

Just what can criminals do with your hacked email account or computer? Brian Krebs has a couple of eye-opening posts describing the value of a hacked email account (iTunes accounts sell for $8 each!) or a hacked PC. This post provides some excellent advice for defending your PC against attacks.

For additional reading, Lifehacker has some good articles on online security as well. And if you’re a Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome user (you should be), here are some resources for securing your browser:

So start the year off right by reading up on cybercrime and taking some simple steps to make sure you don’t fall victim to it.

Photo source: Mario & Amanda, Flickr

Free Speech and Privacy at Work

When can an employee’s off-duty web postings or other activities be reasonably monitored and controlled by an employer in order to protect the business? This has been a recurring question since the rise of the public internet and especially of social media. This article does a nice job of reviewing the case law and dissecting the issues of privacy, free speech, and employer loyalty with regard to online postings, and notes that:

It is fair to say that although technology has changed the playing field, the principles with respect to off-duty conduct in Canada have not changed. As long as employees must remain subordinate and loyal to their employer, there are limits to what they can express, even on their own devices and even if they are off-duty.

While an employer can never completely control the online behaviour of its employees, it can manage the delicate balance between protecting the business and respecting the rights of employees to privacy and free speech by putting in place “a well-drafted and well-communicated policy which clearly identifies acceptable workplace practices and use of company equipment as well as personal equipment, both at work and off work.”